Interview Practice Tools

How to Practice for an Interview

Practice makes perfect. That’s according to the old adage that everyone knows, especially professional athletes. The same applies to job interviews as well.

Doing a mock interview and practicing answers to common questions makes you more comfortable with the real thing. Mock interviews can increase your skills, make you less nervous during an interview, and help you get a job offer.

The only way to practice interviews for a long time was the do-it-yourself method. In other words, getting together with a friend or career counselor. But nowadays, several new online tools exist to facilitate interview practice. Some of them are fee-based, but others are entirely free.

Google recently released its new “Interview Warm-Up” Tool that enables people to answer mock interview questions. Google’s tool is machine-learning powered, as you speak to an automated interviewer and then review your answers.

There are other online interview practice tools out there too. Google isn’t the only one that has one. Job candidates can use these tools to supplement their do-it-yourself mock interviews and get even better at the interview process.

Empire Resume will detail some of these online interview practice tools, including if they’re necessary and what the benefits of using one may be.

Google’s Interview Warm-Up Tool

How to Practice for an Interview

Google’s Interview Warm-Up tool includes a range of questions picked by industry experts related to specific industries. The questions are gathered from the company’s Career Certificates program. You can choose the industry you’re interviewing in, but Google says some questions are general and can apply to anyone.

As you answer each question asked by the tool, your response appears in real-time so you can check to see how you did. What’s cool about the Google program is it uses machine learning to detect patterns that can give insights into your answers, such as job-related terms you use and the words you say the most frequently. The machine-learning software will also highlight your talking points in each response and tell you how much time you spend talking about your experience, skills, goals, and other topics.

The best part? Google’s interview practice tool is free.

The program is still very new as of this writing, so Google is still working out the parts that aren’t effective. But some reviewers have said so far that Google’s interview practice tool isn’t very helpful. Writing on ZDNet, Chris Matyszczyk said the AI listening through his microphone didn’t do a good job of deciphering any meaningful patterns in his answers. He wasn’t too happy with the tool.

Still, it’s free and quick, so it’s worth a shot for any job seeker.

LinkedIn’s Interview Practice Tool

How to Practice for an Interview

LinkedIn actually beat Google to the punch, releasing a similar tool in 2020 that enables users to record themselves while answering common interview questions. The automated interview feedback tool provides suggestions on answer delivery, including pacing, use of “filler words,” and phrases you should avoid in the interview.

After you record your answers, you can send the video to LinkedIn connections and ask for feedback. The interview practice tool is specifically designed for online and virtual interviews, which have become much more common today.

LinkedIn and Google’s systems are similar, and if used in combination, they offer an excellent way to improve interview skills and prepare to present yourself. But really, both tools could also be good for improving public speaking skills.

LinkedIn’s interview practice tool is also free, though you need an account on the website.

Glassdoor’s Interview Questions

How to Practice for an Interview

Another excellent tool for practicing interviews is Glassdoor’s Company Interview Questions. Search for the company you’re interviewing for, and Glassdoor usually lists common questions that candidates were asked. People submit these questions voluntarily to the site and other helpful information, such as average salaries and reviews of working for the company. Taken altogether, the information gives a good glimpse and preview of what it’s like to work at the company you’re checking out.

Pramp

Pramp is another free interview practice tool, but it’s explicitly designed for computer programming and tech industry workers. Pramp users can sign up and practice live interviews with peers. This site also provides interview coaching from experts at leading companies for a fee.

Candorful

How to Practice for an Interview

Candorful is an interview practice website geared toward military veterans. The site offers free interview coaching for transitioning military personnel and military spouses. It’s easy to get started, too –schedule a call to set up a personalized interview coaching plan if you’re interested.

Monster

Monster.com has an interview practice tool, too. Monster’s tool is a mobile app designed for iPhones and iPads, and the features are displayed in a before, during, and after approach. So, you record interview answers to practice questions and document your thoughts afterward.

Resources to Take Advantage Of

How to Practice for an Interview

From Google to Monster.com, there are online interview practice tools out there for everyone, and they can be a big help. Some of the tech may still be in the early stages, so it’s best to not lean on it too heavily. You should still do your own vigorous pre-interview preparation, and it’s probably a good idea to practice interviewing with a real, live person. These new online tools can simply be used to supplement your interview prep.

Practicing interviews is a great way to gain confidence, and it can lower stress and anxiety during the actual interview. Many companies use behavioral questions to catch you off-guard, so thinking through and practicing these answers will make you much more prepared.

Interview practice tools come in many shapes and sizes, and many of the online tools available today are free. Take advantage of the resources out there, and you won’t regret it, as you’ll be more relaxed, confident, and comfortable when doing an actual job interview.

Stay tuned to Empire Resume’s blog for more helpful insights into careers and employment, including articles such as How to Connect with People on LinkedIn, What to Write in a Cover Letter for a Job, and Why Employee Referrals are So Powerful.

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Maria Gold is a Content Manager/Writer for Empire Resume. She is dedicated to helping educate and motivate people with the latest career articles and job search advice. Her interests range from writing to programming and design. She is also passionate about innovation, entrepreneurship, and technology.

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