What it’s Really Like to be a Navy Seal?

Life as a Navy Seal

Being a Navy SEAL is not for the faint of heart. The SEALs are a highly specialized group of experts who carry a mental and physical capabilities far beyond what is required of standard military teams. If you’ve ever wanted to walk in the shoes of a Navy SEAL, look no further as Empire Resume paints the picture right before your very eyes.

But before we dive in, we must understand what a Navy SEAL is and how this organization was started.

What Is A Navy SEAL?

Life as a Navy Seal

According to Military.com, the Navy Sea, Air, and Land team, commonly referred to as Navy SEALs, are the world’s greatest fighting force. In 1962, President John F. Kennedy established this elite maritime force for all aspects of unconventional warfare.

The Navy website shows the duties of the SEALs include the following:

  • Conducting insertions and extractions by sea, air or land to accomplish covert, Special Warfare/Special Operations missions;
  • Capturing high-value enemy personnel and terrorists around the world;
  • Collecting information and intelligence through special reconnaissance missions;
  • Carrying out small-unit, direct-action missions against military targets; and
  • Performing underwater reconnaissance and the demolition of natural or man-made obstacles prior to amphibious landings.

The Navy SEAL organization has teams consisting of enlisted and officers who are stationed all over the country to perform various duties. But the most notable team of all is SEAL Team Six.

SEAL Team Six is most recognized for carrying out the mission to execute the world’s most wanted terrorist — Osama Bin Ladin. Learn more about this mission on History.com.

The Daily Life of a Navy SEAL

Life as a Navy Seal

From what we can see, being a Navy SEAL is tough and every day is different. The life of a SEAL changes in accordance with current events.

Remember, SEAL Teams are the Navy’s special operations force who are sea, air, and land experts. On any given day, a SEAL can perform an airborne mission and chase a target in the ocean the next. According to Huffington Post, SEALs have ample opportunity to prepare for operations. Preparing means physical training to include running, lifting weights, swimming, parachuting, diving, shooting targets, and assembling weapons.

To learn more about how SEALs train, check out the day in the life of a SEAL written by a former SEAL Team Six member.

SEAL Teams are close knit — like a brotherhood or sisterhood. Together, the members work in all sorts of combat environments and terrain. They have the ability to maneuver from the desert to snow to mountains to the jungle in no time.

The SEAL Ethos

Life as a Navy Seal

Each individual chosen to take part in this specialized group lives by the Navy SEAL Ethos. The SEAL Ethos is intended to make everyone a better person. It provides each member with inspiration, humility, and a never-ending warrior spirit.

The ethos is a great character-building tool as well as leadership tool, because every Navy SEAL is a leader in their own right. Read the SEAL Ethos below:

In times of war or uncertainty there is a special breed of warrior ready to answer our Nation’s call. Common citizens with uncommon desire to succeed. Forged by adversity, they stand alongside America’s finest special operations forces to serve their country, the American people, and protect their way of life. I am that warrior.

My Trident is a symbol of honor and heritage. Bestowed upon me by the heroes that have gone before, it embodies the trust of those I have sworn to protect. By wearing the Trident, I accept the responsibility of my chosen profession and way of life. It is a privilege that I must earn every day.

My loyalty to Country and Team is beyond reproach. I humbly serve as a guardian to my fellow Americans always ready to defend those who are unable to defend themselves. I do not advertise the nature of my work, nor seek recognition for my actions. I voluntarily accept the inherent hazards of my profession, placing the welfare and security of others before my own.

I serve with honor on and off the battlefield. The ability to control my emotions and my actions, regardless of circumstance, sets me apart from others. Uncompromising integrity is my standard. My character and honor are steadfast. My word is my bond.

We expect to lead and be led. In the absence of orders I will take charge, lead my teammates and accomplish the mission. I lead by example in all situations.

I will never quit. I persevere and thrive on adversity. My Nation expects me to be physically harder and mentally stronger than my enemies. If knocked down, I will get back up, every time. I will draw on every remaining ounce of strength to protect my teammates and to accomplish our mission. I am never out of the fight.

We demand discipline. We expect innovation. The lives of my teammates and the success of our mission depend on me – my technical skill, tactical proficiency, and attention to detail. My training is never complete.

We train for war and fight to win. I stand ready to bring the full spectrum of combat power to bear in order to achieve my mission and the goals established by my country. The execution of my duties will be swift and violent when required yet guided by the very principles that I serve to defend.

Brave SEALs have fought and died building the proud tradition and feared reputation that I am bound to uphold. In the worst of conditions, the legacy of my teammates steadies my resolve and silently guides my every deed. I will not fail.

Navy SEAL Training

Life as a Navy Seal

A college degree is not required to be a SEAL as an enlisted sailor. But Navy SEAL officers have different requirements.

Training to be a Navy SEAL starts with over 12 months of training to include the Basic Underwater Demolition/Seals (BUD/S) training program, Parachute Jump School, and SEAL Qualification Training (SQT).

Once those three trainings are complete, SEALs have an additional 18 months of pre-deployment training and intensive specialized training. These trainings are designed to push one’s physical and mental limits.

For more details on SEAL training, view the Official Naval Special Warfare website.

Can A Woman Be A Navy SEAL?

Life as a Navy Seal

Women are making history each day and, of course, they are welcome to join the Navy’s most elite team. However, there was a period in time where women were excluded from joining certain military teams like the SEALs.

In 2015, the U.S. Navy opened its SEAL teams to women who can pass the rigorous training program. This was a history making announcement, since the SEALs were the last traditional male-only branch to extend invites to women.

Empire Resume Readers Sound Off

Life as a Navy Seal

We can spend hours discussing about what it’s like to be a Navy SEAL. At the moment, we’d love to hear from you. Do you know what it’s like to be a Navy SEAL? If you have first-hand knowledge that’ll help someone who may be considering joining the military and becoming a part of the Navy’s elite squad, let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

As always, be sure to bookmark our military blog so you can join Empire Resume right here next week for another informative article.

Dr. Phillip Gold is President/CEO of Empire Resume and has vast experience writing resumes for service-members transitioning from the military into civilian roles. He served as a Captain in the U.S. Air Force responsible for leading nuclear missile security. Phillip is a Certified Professional Resume Writer and holds a BA in Communications from The Ohio State University, an MS in Instructional Technology, an MBA in Finance, and a PhD in Finance.

Life as a Navy Seal

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